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Welcome to Knowledge Jolt with Jack. This is where I have been keeping my ongoing thoughts about knowledge management, Theory of Constraints, and related topics since 2004.

One of my biggest interests is how these techniques can help the individual perform better in their role, and then how that individual performance can roll up to a higher-level business performance. Because if individuals cannot do well, there is no chance that the organization can do well.

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What follows are excerpts of my recent blog entries. Click through for the full text.

In my work the idea of "flow" is all about ensuring the right work gets started - work that will create value for the organization. And, once it has started, that it doesn't get stuck or stopped or held up until the value is created. Ideally: customer buys the results; savings are truly achieved.
The latest HBR Ideacast interview with Erin Reid talks about Why We Pretend to be Workaholics (based on a related HBR article). I enjoyed the discussion, but what really got to me is this idea of "pretending to be busy."
First impressions depend on our assessment of the person's warmth and their likelihood to do us harm. Science of Us provides a nice way to think about this in The Simpsons First-Impression Matrix.
Besides finding some extra lint in there, why do people get into navel gazing? When does it help? When not? Some interesting thoughts on the topic from Megan and Euan in Shift episode 35.
Interesting video description of a simplified Current Reality Tree that Bill Dettmer calls an Executive Summary Tree.
The interesting comment that just because you know something, it doesn't mean you understand it.
So, is multitasking bad or good. This author talks about both sides and then decides he wants to continue multitasking anyway.
Dealing with uncertainty / variability in operations is an important aspect of the TOC way of thinking and in the TOC applications.
Eli Schragenheim, author of a number of Theory of Constraints books and an active participant in ongoing TOC thinking has started writing his own blog.
There are plenty of job descriptions that make you scratch your head, wondering what they are really looking to hire. The classic is the job requirements for "good at multitasking" when that can be exactly the wrong trait. I came across one that throws Theory of Constraints and cost reductions into the same set of requirements.
I came across the video from the University of Texas 2014 Commencement address by Admiral William H McRaven in which he describes his training and draws ten life lessons. The story is engaging, and while the lessons out of context sound odd, they make sense in the way he puts it together.
"The CIO's Guide to Breakthrough Project Portfolio Performance: Applying the Best of Critical Chain, Agile, and Lean" by Michael Hannan, Wolfram Muller, and Hilbert Robinson is a good, short description of how to take ideas from several disciplines and apply them to an overall portfolio management approach.
Picture a steaming coffee cup. Better yet, grab one and have a read!

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