Welcome!

Welcome to Knowledge Jolt with Jack. This is where I have been keeping my ongoing thoughts about knowledge management, Theory of Constraints, and related topics since 2004.

One of my biggest interests is how these techniques can help the individual perform better in their role, and then how that individual performance can roll up to a higher-level business performance. Because if individuals cannot do well, there is no chance that the organization can do well.

Please explore the webiste, subscribe to my webfeed, or learn some more about me. Even better, leave a comment here or take the thoughts into your own website and extend them.

 

What follows are excerpts of my recent blog entries. Click through for the full text.

Arthur Shelley posted his 12 Principles of Knowledge Leadership to a KM mailing list - turns out he wrote this a year and a half ago. Good reference material! He even channels Gandhi.
Henry Camp has created a nice two-page summary of Theory of Constraints and made it available for all to use. I have grabbed a copy (with permission) and it is available from my website too.
Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry has a nice piece on TOC and how valuable it is. And he mentions that Jeff Bezos has all his Amazon executives read The Goal. What I'd love to see is an article that describes HOW a company like Amazon is using TOC within the business.
Is the goal of a for-profit company to "make more money, now and in the future"? I suppose it depends on how you define the terms.
I hope your 2014 has been exciting and challenging. And I hope that your 2015 brings new adventure and new learnings.
I've come across several recent articles in the press from India that talk about Theory of Constraints and the application at a number of companies.
"Pride and Joy" by Alex Knight is a Theory of Constraints business novel about a hospital in chaos and a way of thinking that can help move beyond the chaos to a truly patient-centric, high quality environment.
There is an InnoCentive challenge to describe a KM approach to "Capturing Institutional Memory and Knowledge." Open through 14 October 2014.
Freek Vermeulen's "Business Exposed" is a great read that debunk a lot of common practice and common beliefs within business. He brings in a variety of business research to back up his sometimes surprising observations.
Rather than describe the solution - a description that is always going to be lacking - understand what problem the customer is trying to solve. What limitation or barrier do they need to overcome? And why do they want to do that?
Clarke Ching has posted a chapter of his ever-in-beta book on Agile / TOC in software developmetnt. His comments ring true and remind me of things that Dave Snowden talks about frequently.
"Knowledge is a treasure chest and its keys are questioning." -Ibn Shihab
Picture a steaming coffee cup. Better yet, grab one and have a read!

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